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Postcolonial Approaches to Eastern European Cinema

Postcolonial Approaches to Eastern European Cinema: Portraying Neighbours On-Screen
Eds. Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen & Eva Näripea
I.B.Tauris, 2014

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All countries and nations are deeply affected by their neighbours and every national cinema reflects this relationship. This book explores how postcolonial approaches can ‘frame’ the neighbours of people living in Eastern Europe. It elucidates how the region has evolved from being a communist extension of the Soviet Union to becoming integrated into neoliberal capitalism.
Drawing on classical studies of postcoloniality by Edward Said, Gayatri C. Spivak and Homi K. Bhabha, as well as theorists and historians like Janusz Korek and Jaak Kangilaski, who specialise in the Eastern European variant of postcolonialism, the book demonstrates particular sensitivity to the question of genre in investigating how neighbours fit into and shape melodramas and thrillers, heritage and war films. Contributors explore a wide range of films in relation to territory, from the steppes of the East to reunified Berlin and to Albania on the Adriatic Sea and from the streets of Tallinn to the hill slopes in Transylvania. Individual chapters situate in a new context movies of internationally celebrated filmmakers, such as Roman Polanski, Agnieszka Holland, Nikita Mikhalkov and Jan Hřebejk, as well as introducing films by locally renowned directors, such as Władysław Pasikowski, Kujtim Çashku, Arsen Anton Ostojić and Leida Laius.
Contents
Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen, Eva Näripea, Introduction: Postcolonial Theory and the Postcommunist World
Kristin Kopp, ‘If Your Car Is Stolen, It Will Soon Be in Poland’: Criminal Representations of Poland and the Poles in German Fictional Film of the 1990s
Ewa Mazierska, Neighbours (Almost) Like Us: Representation of Germans, Germanness and Germany in Polish Communist and Postcommunist Cinema
Petra Hanáková, ‘I’m at Home Here’: Sudeten Germans in Czech Postcommunist Cinema
Peter Hames, Jánošík: The Cross-Border Hero
John Cunningham, From Nationalism to Rapprochement? Hungary and Romania On-Screen
Elżbieta Ostrowska, Postcolonial Fantasies. Imagining the Balkans: The Polish Popular Cinema of Władysław Pasikowski
Špela Zajec, ‘Narcissism of Minor Differences’? Problems of ‘Mapping’ the Neighbour in Post-Yugoslav Serbian Cinema
Vlastimir Sudar, New Neighbours, Old Habits and Nobody’s Children: Croatia in the Face of Old Yugoslavia
Bruce Williams, The Distant Among Us: Kolonel Bunker (1998) in a Postcolonial Context
Lars Kristensen, The ‘Far East’ Neighbour in Nikita Mikhalkov’s Urga (1991)
Eva Näripea, The Women Who Weren’t There: Russians in Late Soviet Estonian Cinema

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